Women Early Jobs

In: Other Topics

Submitted By Nielraza
Words 967
Pages 4
During the nineteenth century, industrialization has transformed the economy of the United States to great heights. This could be seen with the rise of new businesses, technological advances and development of modern and large-scale factories. This has opened job opportunities, not only to men but also to women. Despite it being advantageous to women, industrialism has imposed a challenge to men, as women are now going for the same position as men in the job market. Gender segregation has affected women in various ways some of which include; low-security conditions, limited job opportunities, poor remuneration and unhealthy working environment just to mention a few. Prior to the nineteenth century, outside the domestic sphere, women had limited sources of income. Industrialization had an undeniable impact on the role of women in all aspects. It affected the way people lived because of the demands of exporting and importing of the industrial economy. Instead a daughter working in the family household, she was seen as a source of income to the family (O’Kelly and Carney, 1986).Sexual harassment and abuse have often been part of the work environment. Many of the supervisors, mostly men, took advantage of their authority and abused young girls and women. In her autobiography, Mary Anderson & Winslow (1951) discusses Anderson’s life as a factory worker. Anderson was 22 years old and she was a member of the trade union movement. Particularly in one of her jobs with Selz and Company, “it was a big place with one thousand workers which the majority was men”. In one instance, she was dismissed for the reason that the supervisor thought she had started the strikes but found out she did not. She got back on the job since she could not find another job and needed the money, but a year later in another situation twelve pairs of shoes were damaged, and the…...

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