Western Equine Encephalitis

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Western Equine Encephalitis / Encephalomyelitis
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Veterinarian Assistant Program, Module 7
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Table of Contents

Title Page…………………….…………………………..……………………………….…1
Table of Contents…………………………….……..…………………………..…………...2
Abstract………………………….………...…………………………………..………….…3
What is a good description of Western Equine Encephalitis?................................................4
What kind of disease is it and how does the disease work?...................................................4
When was Western Equine Encephalitis Discovered / History?............................................4
Which animals/species/age group are at risk for Western Equine Encephalitis?..................5
What diseases can WEE be confused or misdiagnosed for?.................................................5
What are the symptoms of Western Equine Encephalitis?....................................................5
Is Western Equine Encephalitis treatable and what is the treatment?...................................6
Is Western Equine Encephalitis zoonotic?............................................................................6
Why is Western Equine Encephalitis relevant to our local environment?............................6
Is Western Equine Encephalitis preventable and what are the preventions?........................7
Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………....8
References / Bibliography…………………………………………………………………9
Appendix A……………………………………………………………………………….10
Appendix B………………………………………………………………………………..11
Appendix C………………………………………………………………………………..12

Abstract
In this research paper I will discuss, in detail, the specifics of Western Equine Encephalitis / Encephalomyelitis. I have used credible resources to back my findings on this infectious virus. A few of the main topics will include: symptoms, treatments, and…...

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