Universal Healthcare

In: Social Issues

Submitted By blaine
Words 788
Pages 4
“Universal Healthcare” Synopsis: The essay, “A Universal Healthcare System: Is It Right for The United States?” by Marleise Rashford describes the positive effect of universal healthcare. In the essay she explains how a universal healthcare system will help this country. The United States is the only industrialize nation that does not provide healthcare for its citizens. She criticizes the American healthcare system. “The current American system cost too much, cover too little and excludes too many” according to Rashford. Marleise Rashford emphasizes that money is not the issue why America has not reform its health system. Corruption, lobbyist, and private insurances are the ones responsible for this. The essay mentions that 45 million Americans are uninsured.

This essay will analyze and critique Rashford’s essay. I support the universal healthcare system. The United States is the only industrialized nation without universal healthcare. The United States ranks poorly compare to other industrialized nations on healthcare. Universal healthcare will cover all the American citizens. It will benefit the underprivileged citizens of this country. American citizens will have a longer life expectancy. Infant mortality rates will decrease. The United States is the only industrialized nation without universal healthcare. (Rashford, 4) Corruption, lobbyist, and private insurances are the ones responsible for this. Private insurance premiums rice twice as fast than the rate of inflation. Private insurances are making record profits. “The number of American without health insurance rose from 1.4 million to 45 million, between 2000 and 2003.” (Rashford, 5) The United States…...

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