Theories of Deviance

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Submitted By luckylukkie
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My Lobotomy By Dully Howard
My Lobotomy is a memoir written by Howard Dully who is among the youngest people who underwent trans-orbital lobotomy. This procedure was performed on him while at the age of 12 and it was initiated by his step mother who disliked his behaviors. He explains how he was diagnosed by schizophrenia, the procedure and how it affected his life and how he learnt that it was not right for the procedure to be performed on him.
Dully’s mother died of cancer and left him under his step mother’s care. Dully grew up in an environment of emotional abuse and rejection. He was severely beaten up and forced to do things by the step mother and due to this emotional strain, he developed deviant behaviors (Dully and Fleming 46). Dully used to fight with his three brothers all the time because, he felt rejected and alienated from the family. He became disobedient to his parents and never took instructions from them. 'If it's a banana, he throws the peel at the window; if it's a candy bar, he leaves the wrapper around some place... he does a good deal of daydreaming and when asked about it he says, "I don't know." He is defiant at times - "You tell me to do this and I'll do that"(Dully 125) Dully’s deviant behaviors like stealing, fighting his brothers and even disobeying his parents made it possible, justified, and even necessary to lobotomize Howard Dully at the age of 12. Dully records in his memoir that he could steal sweets and leave the wrappers in the open so that they could know he did it. When asked if he did something, he could deny it yet he has left evidence that he did it. The nature of him doing bad things intentionally justified his parent’s act of taking him to be labotized because they felt that he was sick. Dully’s defiance and daydreaming spells made Freeman decide that it is enough for the procedure to…...

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