The Logics of Politics

In: Social Issues

Submitted By scjorgensen
Words 755
Pages 4
Scott Jorgensen
American Government
Dr. Gollob
8/31/14

Americans have all different political views, but when I think about how most Americans define the concept of logical when judging their government, I think of chaos. I think many Americans base their logic off how the government should be run that is best fit for them. Previous decisions made by government also make a large impact in how Americans define the concept of logical. If the government makes decisions that are highly questionable, there are two likely outcomes. One, Americans will support the decisions that these high officials make. Or two, as something goes not as planned or not promised (which seems to happen quite often) people will instantly judge our governments’ concept of logic and questions start to arise as to if our government is making the right decisions. Americans should define the concept of logical when judging their government based off what is right for America as a whole. Some decisions made by government are necessary and might be directed to a certain economy class. For instance, the government might pass a law or act that benefits the lower classes while those in middle and higher class are not affected. Decisions that are made that won’t necessarily be effective right away, but more towards the near future should be brought to attention as well. People don’t understand that when the government says they are going to improve something or pass a law that will be beneficial for Americans over a long-term stretch, that those decisions take time. Change and promises wont happen overnight. People are too quick to pull the trigger in their concept of whether government is being logical if changes aren’t made immediately or don’t go necessarily as planned. CNN released an article recently headlining “Defeat of ISIS called unlikely on Obama watch”. Obama made…...

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