Statistical Tables

In: Business and Management

Submitted By jmgaivao
Words 51801
Pages 208
STATISTICAL TABLES

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES in
MANAGEMENT
and
ECONOMICS

Binomial Distribution – probability function

1

Binomial Distribution – f(x) f (x; n, p) = f (x) n x
1 0
1 1
2 0
2 1
2 2
3 0
3 1
3 2
3 3
4 0
4 1
4 2
4 3
4 4
5 0
5 1
5 2
5 3
5 4

n x px qn−x p 0.05
0.9500
0.0500
0.9025
0.0950
0.0025
0.8574
0.1354
0.0071
0.0001
0.8145
0.1715
0.0135
0.0005
0.0000
0.7738
0.2036
0.0214
0.0011
0.0000

0.1
0.9000
0.1000
0.8100
0.1800
0.0100
0.7290
0.2430
0.0270
0.0010
0.6561
0.2916
0.0486
0.0036
0.0001
0.5905
0.3281
0.0729
0.0081
0.0005

0.15
0.8500
0.1500
0.7225
0.2550
0.0225
0.6141
0.3251
0.0574
0.0034
0.5220
0.3685
0.0975
0.0115
0.0005
0.4437
0.3915
0.1382
0.0244
0.0022

0.2
0.8000
0.2000
0.6400
0.3200
0.0400
0.5120
0.3840
0.0960
0.0080
0.4096
0.4096
0.1536
0.0256
0.0016
0.3277
0.4096
0.2048
0.0512
0.0064

0.25
0.7500
0.2500
0.5625
0.3750
0.0625
0.4219
0.4219
0.1406
0.0156
0.3164
0.4219
0.2109
0.0469
0.0039
0.2373
0.3955
0.2637
0.0879
0.0146

0.3
0.7000
0.3000
0.4900
0.4200
0.0900
0.3430
0.4410
0.1890
0.0270
0.2401
0.4116
0.2646
0.0756
0.0081
0.1681
0.3601
0.3087
0.1323
0.0283

0.35
0.6500
0.3500
0.4225
0.4550
0.1225
0.2746
0.4436
0.2389
0.0429
0.1785
0.3845
0.3105
0.1115
0.0150
0.1160
0.3124
0.3364
0.1811
0.0488

0.4
0.6000
0.4000
0.3600
0.4800
0.1600
0.2160
0.4320
0.2880
0.0640
0.1296
0.3456
0.3456
0.1536
0.0256
0.0778
0.2592
0.3456
0.2304
0.0768

0.45
0.5500
0.4500
0.3025
0.4950
0.2025
0.1664
0.4084
0.3341
0.0911
0.0915
0.2995
0.3675
0.2005
0.0410
0.0503
0.2059
0.3369
0.2757
0.1128

0.5
0.5000
0.5000
0.2500
0.5000
0.2500
0.1250
0.3750
0.3750
0.1250
0.0625
0.2500
0.3750
0.2500
0.0625
0.0312
0.1562
0.3125
0.3125
0.1562…...

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