Religious Diversity in America

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By blaine
Words 858
Pages 4
Today the United States is considered the most diverse nation in the world compared to 50 years ago. During the past 50 years immigrants from around the world have dramatically changed the landscape of America. From Christianity to Judaism, from Buddhism to Hinduism and a variety of other faiths are found today around the different regions of the United States, such as in our own cities and neighborhoods. Religion in America has many branches, due to its large pool of different belief and multicultural traditions that have developed over time.
The signing of the Immigration Act of 1965 by President Johnson was just the beginning of contributing to the end of discrimination toward immigrants (Love-Andrews). Leading to a dramatic change in the way in which immigration functions here in the United States, and by opening “…the borders to another wave of newcomers” (Prothero 3). Before the Immigration Act of 1965 specific ethic groups mainly from Asia, were being limited in the number of immigrants that were allowed to enter the United States. So by the Immigration Act of 1965 the doors to America were once again open for immigrants from around the world no matter what race and religious background they came from (Eck 6). Since then the mass of immigrants came mostly from the Near East, Asia and Latin America, with Latin Americans contributing to the largest group (Lippy 29). “…The revolutions of the 1960’s and thereafter radically challenged traditional sources of authority and transcendent truth; sought new foundations for personal identity…looked to the authority of individual or command experience over sacred texts…,” explains Lippy (241). America’s new religious landscape is changing traditional religious attitudes due to the big variety of different religions found today. Americans now have into account the different types of spiritual practices…...

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