Reflec

In: English and Literature

Submitted By jasbassi
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Reflection 2 In just one week of college I have learned so much. One of the first handouts we read in this class was “Reading as a Mindful Practice”. This is one handout that I will always refer back to since it has helped me get through this first week of college. The thing I like about this handout is that it gives some wonderful tips on how to stay focused when reading. Such as finding a quiet, distraction-free place, sitting in an upright bodily position, also just spending 2-5 minutes breathing mindfully. I would also like to say that installing the “Insight Timer” has helped me focus on reading tremendously. From the handout “Curriculum as Conversation” I have learned that a conversation is more than just chatting it up with your friends. A Conversation with a capital “C” is more about engaging in an academic conversation. The quote I had used from this handout in my first reading log was, “Thus the purpose of learning to read well, write well, and think well is not so much about mastering the rules for grammar, or filling out the perfect “compare/contrast” essay, rather I believe that learning is about entering into Conversations, that matter in the real world, figuring out what others have to say, analyzing the value of what they say, and determining where you stand, based on your reading, research, and thinking.” For some reason this specific quote has just really stuck to me. I feel like this is a definition I would use to describe learning because I know that learning is so much more than just following the rules. It’s about pouring your heart out in a conversation and engaging someone else and making them see things in your perspective. By applying this quote to my work in this class, I know I will be able to become a more successful reader and writer. I’ve started to feel a little bit more comfortable with what I write because I know…...

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