Oriental Ideology & East Asian Economic Growth

In: Business and Management

Submitted By blaine
Words 2373
Pages 10
Introduction
Throughout the years, Asia has been flooded all sorts of ideologies, which has manifested within every Asian souls thus influencing their everyday behaviour in life. The Western people have been studying the ideologies of Asia, which they refer to as “oriental ideology”.
Oriental is connotation of or the characteristic of the bio-geographic region including southern Asia and the Malay Archipelago as far as the Philippines, Borneo and Java (http://lookwayup.com). It is the same as “Asian” and “Eastern”. For people of South and East Asian ancestry the term ‘Asian’ is preferred to ‘Oriental’. According to http://education.yahoo.com, Asian is now strongly preferred in place of Oriental for persons native to Asia or descended from an Asian people. The real problem with Oriental is more likely its connotations stemming from an earlier era when Europeans viewed the regions east of the Mediterranean as exotic lands full of romance and intrigue, the home of despotic empires and inscrutable customs.
Orientalism is the study of Near and Far Eastern societies and cultures, languages and peoples by Western scholars. It can also refer to the imitation or depiction of aspects of Eastern cultures in the West by writers, designers and artists. The hubs of strong traditions that are easily visible lie in East Asia. The following countries are commonly seen as located in geographically East Asia: People's Republic of China (China), Hong Kong and Macau (a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China), Republic of China (Taiwan), Japan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea), Republic of Korea (South Korea), and Mongolia (Wikipedia 2007).

Oriental Ideologies
These are the main ideologies connected with Asia: Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism/Daoism. Others comprise of Shinto and Zen (Eastern Buddhism). Over 93% of Taiwanese are…...

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