Media Management - a Management Buyout (Mbo) Is a Form of Acquisition Where a Company’s Existing Managers Acquire a Large Part or All of Company

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MEDIA MANAGEMENT

CASE STUDY : 1

The verb Manage comes from the Italian maneggiare (to handle especially a horse), which in turn derives from the Latin manus (hand). The French word management (later management) influenced the development in meaning of the English word management in the 17th and 18th Centuries. Management has to do with power by position, whereas leadership involves power by influence.

Q1) Explain the meaning of Management?
Q2) What are the functions of management?
Q3) Explain one function of management in brief?
Q4) Explain the branches of management towards the end of 20th Century?

CASE STUDY : 2

A management buyout (MBO) is a form of acquisition where a company’s existing managers acquire a large part or all of company. Management buyouts are similar in all major legal aspects to any other acquisition of a company. The particular nature of the management buyout lies in the position of the buyers as managers of the company and the practical consequences that follow from that. In particular, the due diligence process is likely to be limited as the buyers already have full knowledge of company available to them. The seller is also unlikely to give any but the most basic warranties to the management, on the basis that the management know more about the company than the sellers do and therefore the sellers should not have to warrant the state of company. These are several ways of financing a management buyouts.

Q1) Explain the purpose of Management buyout (MBO)?
Q2) Explain the various ways of financing a management buyouts?
Q3) Give some examples of MBO’s?
Q4) Explain the objectives for MBO?

CASE STUDY : 3

Journalism is a discipline of writing. News-oriented journalism is…...

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