Marx View on Education

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Submitted By gho3tz
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Marxist View on Education Marxists view society as based on conflict. They believe that the role of all institutions in society can be understood in terms of how they relate to the economic system. They therefore see the education system as an institution that reproduces the class system and provides the economy with a suitable workforce. Example of this is Education picks the best students and teaches them much higher-level material such as Higher Tier. The labour force needs professional and managerial workers, as well as skilled and unskilled manual workers. So this makes some get those skills and a better grade and therefore on a much better position after in society such as a doctor, lawyer ect.. Meanwhile the lower tier students are in a way thought of the system that there is winners and losers, therefore in a way they are direction towards manual work where not much skill is required. According to Marxists, the role of the education system is to provide workers for every part of the society and the economy. Bowls and Gintis who illustrate a strong correspondence between what is learnt in schools and what is required in work for the Capitalist system, they see the people who are the most obedient and non questioning have the biggest success as those values are more valuable in the work place as this shows you ‘accept’ the authority of the boss and not question what has to be done in order to complete the job. Bowles and Gintis believe that the content of the curriculum is not very important and that pupils learn most from the ‘hidden curriculum’ as that is what life would be, to do boring stuff which we don't really care for a reward such as a qualification or in the workplace for money. However, Bowles and Gintis are highly criticised because they actually never went to schools and test their theory and…...

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