Japanese Students

In: Social Issues

Submitted By mcorrea716
Words 2318
Pages 10
Contents Summary of Report 2 Introduction 3 What is Stress? 4 Japanese Curriculum 5 Stress Outcomes and Problems 6 Comparison 7 Works Cited 10

Summary of Report

This report describes the Japanese education style and the effects it has in its students as well as society as a whole. There is information on how children are taught, and the way their learning behaviors develop in Japan, as well as compared to that of our American curriculums. Anyone can be under stress, students are one group of people who especially during those angst teenage years undergo a vast majority of stress. A survey by the American Psychological Association found that nearly half of all teens — 45 percent — said they were stressed by school pressures. (Neighmond). In the report we will try to compare the differences between what students in the United States go through in comparison to those in Japan. In Japan the Japanese teaching guidelines are very different from what we here are used to. In Japan children are not separated based on how well or bad they are performing in school rather their age, and they are expected to have the diligence to simply catch upon their own. Not only are the teaching styles different, nor just the way students learn, the schools themselves are different. The school calendar year in Japan is longer than that of the U.S, thus resulting in higher stress in Students. We reviewed how the stressors Japanese students undergo, has lead to an increase in teen suicide, and how some of those stressors differentiate from those teens here face. The paper not only focuses on the stress, and development of teens, rather it focuses on how stress varies in different cultures. The teaching styles vary, the learning styles, the everyday lives of students in Japan, and how the stress the Japanese government has put on them makes that much worst.…...

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