Gold Rush

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Submitted By bugelee85
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The traditional beginning of the Gold Rush was the story of James Marshall.

Marshall was instructed by John Sutter, a business man, to find an area to build a

sawmill. Marshall, traveled with a few workers, it took him a while to find the right spot

because: "nothing but a mule could climb the hills; and when I would find a spot where

the hills were not steep, there was no timber to be had" (Holliday 56). Marshall had

finally found an area where he could build a sawmill, and managed to get his team

through the steep hills of California. One morning he came upon an area of the camp to

check the status of the camp. When he was observing the water flow, he noticed

something really shiny. Marshall picked up the gold pieces, assuming that this was a

fluke, but as the day grew older, he found a few more pieces of gold. Then there was that

famous quote that people tend to still say today: "Boys, by God I believe I have found a

gold mine. (Holliday 58)”

This story was taken in to account as the first story to hit the globe about gold

being found in California. Actually, there is another story. This one is about a Mexican,

who found gold in the hills of California, long before news had spread about gold being

found by James Marshall. His name was Francisco Lopez. He was traveling in the San

Fernando Valley, in 1842, during the time California was still a territory. Lopez was

taking a rest, when he found a few pieces of gold, as he continued to dig, he found more

gold. Ironically enough, the gold mines that Lopez had discovered were in the south of

California towards Los Angeles and the gold that was found by Marshall was in the north

towards present-day San Francisco. Also the mines that were used to dig up the gold

found by Lopez were rarely used during the great Gold Rush in the north,…...

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