Global Human Rights Perspective

In: Social Issues

Submitted By melinarae
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Global Human Rights Perspective
Women’s and Gender Studies 422

When using a global human rights perspective to determine solutions to the worldwide issue of violence against women, information can be analyzed to help determine root causes of abuse. Once a root cause is determined, methods of correction can begin to develop. There are many issues that impact women’s status and power that them more vulnerable to violence, some of which are introduced in ‘Women Across Cultures’, in four main themes, “Gender Inequality as a Historical, Sociocultural Phenomenon, Activism and Empowerment, Multicultural, Intersectional, Contextualized Approach, and Women’s Rights as Human Rights” (Burn, 2011). When core issued are looked at from a global perspective, organizations can begin to work together and share knowledge to assist one another. It is also for women to recognize their similarities and advocate for one another, regardless of country of origin, race, social status, and so forth. “Inequality as a Historical, Sociocultural Phenomenon” (Burn, 2011) is a way of determining the root causes of oppression in women. Some believe that due to the favorability of men, but not women being able to acquire property, leaves many women in abusive and controlling situations. Since private property rights are only available to men, this leaves women with little or no resources to leave an abusive situation (Burn, 2011). Male patriarchy is described as, “The idea that gender inequality is embedded in family, cultural, economic, political, and social structures” (Burn, 2011). This includes social systems that are male dominant. Many researcher believe that this mentality emerged during the Neolithic period when women and children were needed to help with farming and agriculture (Burn, 2011). Women and children were exploited, controlled, and used as a labor force. Sociocultural…...

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