Enron Trial

In: Business and Management

Submitted By elfontheshelf
Words 355
Pages 2
1.What is the type of court, including where it is located, in which the Enron trial was held? The United States Supreme located in Houston Texas, held the Enron Trial.
2. Was the Enron trial a civil trial or a criminal trial? Enron was a criminal trial.
3. How long was the trial expected to take? As stated in the, An Enron Jury Free of Grudges, article it states that the expected to last up to 6 months.
4. a. Who are the defendants in this case? Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling b. What were their positions in Enron (be specific)? Former Chief Executives c. Name the charges and how many were brought against each of them? Jeffrey Skilling was charged with 31 counts of conspiracy, fraud and insider trading. Kennethy Lay was charged with 7 counts of fraud and conspiracy.
5. How much was it believed that the defendants would be paying for their defense? It was reported that they would spend a combined total of over $20 million.
6. How many people were in the original jury pool as of Fall 2005? The original pool of jurors had 400.
7. How many people were in the final jury pool prior to voir dire in the courtroom on Monday, January 30, 2006? There were 96 jurors who survived from the original pool.
8. How many pages were in the questionnaire filled out by the people in the jury pool? The questionnaire was 14 pages
9. How many questions were in the questionnaire? There was a total of 76 questions.
10. How many questions in the questionnaire related directly to Enron? Sixteen specific questions were asked about Enron.
11. According to the articles, in general, how is the voir dire conducted in state courtrooms? The lawyers are allowed to question individual jurors during the final selection process.
12. According to the articles, in general, how is the voir dire conducted in federal courtrooms? They used jury questionnaires…...

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