Economic Reform in China Post 1978

In: Business and Management

Submitted By blaine
Words 2342
Pages 10
First of all I will discuss China’s historical background and its need for reform and also how economic reform started out in 1978. Then I will go on to cover the four major economic institutions that needed to be reformed in order for China to become a market economy. These four major economic institutions will then be discussed in detail. This paper will then go briefly into China joining the WTO and will conclude with China’s economic situation at present.

Chinese economic policies and institution have undergone a number of extreme changes since the establishment of the Communist regime in 1949. After the Communist Party took national power in 1949, the disorder caused by the imperialist invasions and domestic wars were put to an end and China began to strive for development by following Russia’s example in pursuing Leninist and Marxist doctrine. By following this doctrine they would replace free market and private ownership with socialist planning and public ownership. In order for this to become a reality China had to pursue radical revolutionary domestic and foreign policies to overcome the resistance to the Chinese Communist movements. After closing its doors to western concepts of capitalism and free market economy it seemed like China was doing well but it was soon evident that the rigid planning and the command market economy was becoming inefficient. In contrast to the western economies China was indeed falling behind. Even China’s neighbors such as Taiwan, Singapore, Korea and Hong Kong were growing rapidly after adopting market economic systems.

At the Third Plenum of the Eleventh Central Committee in 1978, the realist Party leaders headed by Deng Xiaoping formally adopted a series of important measures to save China from crisis. These were later known to become the open door policies. So, it could be said that the reform process was put into…...

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