Difficulties of Crossing the Border & Fear of Deportation When Being in the United States

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By angelagarcia248
Words 1574
Pages 7
Many immigrants come to the United States for a better future for their families and themselves, but not knowing the difficulties they must face crossing the border to get here first. Immigrants know it is not an easy thing to do migrating to the United States because it is not that simple as getting on a plane and heading over here. They must face many challenges and risks crossing the border without getting caught or killed. Once they finally get here (the ones that survive) they realize the danger is not over, but it just beginning. Immigrants that migrate to the United States in pursue of a better life for their families and themselves, but face the first challenge even before crossing the border, which is leaving their families behind. “When men and women immigrate illegally to the United States, they often leave much more than a town and a country. They leave fathers and mothers, husbands and wives, sons and daughters. The children sometimes grow up not knowing their parents — and sometimes never seeing them again. In some cases, they come to resent the parent who isn’t there at Christmas or on their birthday or to tuck them in at night.” (Trevizo) leaving family behind is the most difficult thing for a parent because you do not know if you will die trying to cross the border or how long it will take to be reunited with the ones you love. They have to say goodbye to their love ones like if it is the last time he or she will see them again. Immigrants pay money to be sneaked into the United States, but sometimes things do not go as planned and many immigrants lose their lives or get caught. “Velazquez was left a widow after her husband Irineo Barrita, 29, was killed together with eight other Mexican nationals-all from Oaxaca-when the driver of the van in which the group was riding attempted to flee the Border Patrol in Palmview, Texas, on April 10, 2012.…...

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