Daedalus and Icarus

In: English and Literature

Submitted By CaptainYooSiJin
Words 1165
Pages 5
The Less Short Story

Daedalus is an Athenian craftsman, famous for his ability to invent and build things. Think Leonardo da Vinci, but with more powers.

Unfortunately, he also has a jealous streak. When his nephew (Talus) invents the saw, Daedalus realizes that the boy might be more talented than he is. Not good.

In a fit of jealousy, Daedalus throws Talos off the Acropolis, a tall monument in Athens. That'll teach him not to invent any more carpentry tools.

Some people say that Athena saw the boy falling, and transformed him into a partridge. But others argue that Talos died and that Daedalus tried to hide the murder by burying him. Well those are very different endings.

Either because he was feeling guilty or because he was banished, Daedalus leaves Athens and heads to the island of Crete.

While he's hanging out there, Daedalus befriends King Minos, the island's ruler. (It pays to have friends in high places.)

Daedalus still has the touch in Crete and he continues his building streak. First, he builds a cow suit so that Crete's queen (Pasiphae) can get it on with a bull. Yes, we said bull.

Pasiphae's union with the bull results in a horrible half-man, half-beast called the Minotaur. Heard of him?

Next up, King Minos (the half-beast's step-dad) asks Daedalus to design a maze (the Labyrinth) in which to put the terrible Minotaur. The Minotaur demands human sacrifices, and every nine years, King Minos sends seven young men and women into the Labyrinth to meet their doom.

One of these victims sent to his death is the hero Theseus. This guy is tough and he decides to fight back and try to kill the Minotaur.

King Minos' daughter, Ariadne, falls madly in love with Theseus. And since Daedalus built the Labyrinth, she asks him to help Theseus safely navigate it.

Always the helpful one, Daedalus gives Theseus a ball of yarn, and tells the hero to trail it…...

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