Corporate Law - a Promissory Note Was Made Without Mentioning Any Time for Payment the Holder Added the Words’ on Demand on the Face of the Instrument

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CORPORATE LAW

Q.1. In the following statements only one is correct statement. Explain Briefly?
(5 Marks)
i) An invitation to negotiate is a good offer. ii) A quasi-contract is not a contract at all. iii) An agreement to agree is a valid contract.

Q.2. A ship-owner agreed to carry to cargo of sugar belonging to A from Constanza to Busrah. He knew that there was a sugar market in Busrah and that A was a sugar merchant, but did not know that he intended to sell the cargo, immediately on its arrival. Owning to Shipment’s default, the voyage was delayed and sugar fetched a lower price than it would have done had it arrived on time. A claimed compensation for the full loss suffered by him because of the delay. Give your decision. Explain
Briefly? (5 Marks)

Q.3. The proprietors of a medical preparation called the “Carbolic Smoke Ball” published in several newspapers the following advertisement:-
“£ 1000 reward will be paid by the Carbolic Smoke Ball Co. to any person who contracts the increasing epidemic influenza after having used the Smoke Ball three times daily for two weeks according to printed directions supplied with each ball. £ 1000 is deposited with the Alliance Bank showing our sincerity in the matter.
On the faith in this advertisement, the plaintiff bought a Smoke Ball and used it as directed. She was attacked by influenza. She sued the company for the reward. Will she succeed? Explain Briefly
(5 Marks)

Q.4. Fazal consigned four cases of Chinese crackers at Kanpur to be carried to Allahabad on the 30th May,
1987. He intended to sell them at the Shabarat festival of 5th June 1987. The railway discovered that the consignment could not be sent by passenger train and asked Fazal either to…...

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