Contestable Market

In: Business and Management

Submitted By blackblood
Words 2998
Pages 12
The RAND Corporation
Contestability in Real-Time Experimental Flow Markets
Author(s): Edward L. Millner, Michael D. Pratt, Robert J. Reilly
Source: The RAND Journal of Economics, Vol. 21, No. 4 (Winter, 1990), pp. 584-599
Published by: Blackwell Publishing on behalf of The RAND Corporation
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2555470
Accessed: 15/04/2009 04:27
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The RAND Corporation and Blackwell Publishing are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The RAND Journal of Economics. http://www.jstor.org RAND Journal of Economics Vol. 21, No. 4, Winter 1990 Contestability in real-time experimental flow markets Edward L. Millner* Michael D. Pratt* and Robert J. Reilly* This article reports the results from…...

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