Civil Liberties

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Submitted By mario04
Words 1981
Pages 8
Civil Liberties In this research paper, I have learned about how different ethnic backgrounds have come about to be members of the greatest nation on Earth. Our country has had both its glory and flaws, but while studying our American History, we learn that our country has endured a lot of changes for the common good, and the irony of others. There have been many solid events that have defined who we are today, and also where we stand in the world. Some of these events include, but are not limited to The Civil Rights Act of 1866, The Progressive Era, The New Deal, Grand Expectations, the Reagan Era, and 21st Century.
First, when we address The Civil Rights Act of 1866, we find that this is an Act to protect all persons in the United States in their Civil Rights, and furnish their means for Vindication. The Progressive Era (1890s-1920s), as the name implies, made huge changes towards the right of women and minorities. This Era was very crucial in the transformation of civil liberties that are enforced today. The New Deal (1933-1939), known for its lasting program of the Social Security Act of 1935, is still taking care of the elder and the disabled. Grand Expectations (1945-1974) was a period of optimism. African Americans finally began to realize many of the deferred dreams left over from decades of Reconstruction from the Civil War, the country was economically prosperous and social reforms promised an even better future. The Reagan Era (1981-1989) known for a restored and regenerated confidence in the nation; brought a positive economic outlook for some, but economic despair for others. And lastly the 21st Century, which along with an African American President, women have made huge gains in politics and in equalities. Now we will proceed to explore these events and discover some of the developments that helped create history throughout the years.

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