Boston Symphony Orchestra

In: Business and Management

Submitted By blaine
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Boston Symphony Orchestra Problem Formulation

The Boston Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1981 by Major Henry Lee Higginson. Higginson was the only manager of the Orchestra, so with his wealth he used one million of his own money to develop and expand. Shortly after World War I, he retired and developed the board of trustees. These trustees were Boston’s most powerful financial, corporate, legal, political, religious, and social communities. The organizational structure of the Orchestra included: the board of trustees, the management staff, the orchestra players, and the music director. Each of the personnel in these groups had different decision making for the Orchestra.
The Orchestra first started off with just a winter season for their concerts. Since they were becoming more famous and more people wanted to attend their concerts, they expanded to six different musical activities. These concerts include the Boston Pops, the Esplanade Concerts, the Berkshire Music Festival, the Berkshire Music Center, and the Boston Symphony Chamber Players. They traveled around the world performing concerts. During this 31-week period, the BSO played 22 weeks at Symphony hall, three weeks in Europe, and five weeks in New York, with a one-week Christmas vacation. The Orchestra also did broadcast live for radio stations and television stations and they also recorded albums there were known world-wide. The concert schedule for a particular season was quite complex, reflecting a rich mixture of tradition, musical performance constraints, musicians’ union contracts, and the preference of contemporary conductors.
The Boston Symphony Orchestra was well known because of the attendance of Boston’s most prominent. In the 1968, revenue decreased from $6,000 in 1968-1969 to over $60,000 in 1969-1970. Having these losses caused many problems for the BSO.
When the…...

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