A Study of: John Hick’s “the Problem of Evil” and Arthur C. Clarke’s “the Star”

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Fall Term (2008) Essay Assignment A Study Of: John Hick’s “The Problem of Evil” and Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Star” Audrey Scott 4272258 PHIL1F91 Andrew T. Seminar 10 The Problem of Evil as outlined as John Hick is that “if God is perfectly loving, he must wish to abolish evil; and if he is all-powerful, he must be able to abolish evil. But evil exists; therefore God cannot be both omnipotent and perfectly loving” (Hick, 1963). In this essay the topic of John Hick’s solutions to “The Problem of Evil” will be looked at. Another subject matter that will be briefly deliberated on in this essay is if and how both of Hicks’ solutions are applicable to Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Star”. The difference between “moral evil” and “natural evil” lies classified in the fact that “moral evil” is essentially wickedness; that God is indirectly responsible for this type of evil because he created human beings and human beings inflict this kind of evil, or malevolent acts on each other on a regular basis. “Moral evil” can also be when one inflicts an action with negative connotations on one’s self. Divergent from “moral evil”, “natural evil” is in reference to natural disasters or occurrences that create suffering which people are victims of, this is a type of evil to which God is directly responsible for, because he controls such physical environmental forces. In his essay, John Hick solves the problem of both “moral evil” by firstly posing a question to the reader of why an all-good and all-powerful God would permit such a thing as degradation of one’s personal character through human interaction to occur, because as his creation, human beings are made in his image and should be as affectionately kind towards one another as God would be if he were a human being dwelling on Earth. Hick communicates that the solution to this first pending question would be that God has created…...

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